Catalysts for Change. Meaningful Partnerships. Moving North Carolina Forward.

These are some of the trends in the field that we are watching because they impact the way we think about and approach our work.

November 15, 2016

Adult Learners, America Needs You Back!

Part I: The 2020 College Completion Goal: Adult Learners, We Want You Back! Only 25 years ago, the United States was ranked first internationally in four-year degree attainment for 25- to 34-year-olds. Today, our rank has slipped down to number 12. The precipitous drop is worrisome not to educators alone, but is evidently also disturbing […]

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November 1, 2016

Philanthropy and the Future of Work: Dimensions of Change and Opportunities for Action

Work is changing in many ways. What does this mean for leaders in philanthropy seeking to expand economic opportunities for low- and moderate-income workers?

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October 17, 2016

Lumina Foundation Releases Strategic Plan Advocating a New Postsecondary Learning System

Transformative changes are needed to reach Goal 2025 and ensure a majority of Americans achieve the postsecondary learning so important for success in the 21st century

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October 13, 2016

The University of North Carolina – A Multi-Campus University: President Spellings’ Inaugural Address

Margaret Spellings was inaugurated as the 18th president of the University of North Carolina, the oldest public university in America, on October 13, 2016. The ceremony was held in Memorial Hall on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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July 1, 2016

Still Questioning Whether College Is Worth It? Read This.

Four-year college graduates for the first time comprise a larger share of the workforce than workers with a high school diploma.

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July 1, 2016

The Typical College Student Is Not Who You Think It Is

Jamie Merisotis, President and CEO of Lumina Foundation, explains that there is “a real disconnect in our understanding of who today’s students are. The influencers––the policy makers, the business leaders, the media––have a very skewed view of who today’s students are.”

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